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1986 Press Photo George C. Scott Last Days Of Patton

$12.33
AdID: 355872

Availability: In stock

Part Number: RRR65915

Height: 7

Width: 9

Source: Rogers

Details

Photo measures 7 x 9 in. George C. Scott stars as general George S. Patton Jr. in The last days Of Patton on CBS.

George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 – September 22, 1999) was an American stage and film actor, director and producer. He was best known for his stage work, as well as his portrayal of General George S. Patton in the film Patton, and as General Buck Turgidson in Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove.

Scott was born in Wise, Virginia, the son of Helena Agnes (née Slemp; 1904–1935) and George D Scott (1902–1988). He was the only son and younger of their two children. His mother died just before his eighth birthday, and he was raised by his father, an executive at the Ex-Cello- Corp. Scott's great-uncle was Republican U.S. Representative C. Bascom Slemp of Virginia.

As a young man, Scott's original ambition was to be a writer like his favorite author, F. Scott Fitzgerald; while in high school, he wrote many short stories, none of which were ever published. As an adult, he tried on many occasions to write a novel, but was never able to complete one to his satisfaction. When asked by an interviewer in later life which contemporary novelists he admired, he replied, "I stopped reading novels when I stopped trying to write them."

Scott joined the US Marines, serving from 1945 until 1949, and was assigned to the prestigious 8th and I Barracks in Washington, D.C. In that capacity, he served as a guard at Arlington National Cemetery and taught English literature and radio speaking/writing at the Marine Corps Institute. He later said that his duties at Arlington led to his drinking.

After his military service, Scott enrolled in the University of Missouri, where he majored in journalism and then became interested in drama; he left college after a year to pursue acting.

Scott first rose to prominence for his work with Joseph Papp's New York Shakespeare Festival. In 1958, he won an Obie Award for his performances in Children of Darkness (in which he made the first of many appearances opposite his future wife, actress Colleen Dewhurst), for As You Like It, and for playing the title character in William Shakespeare's Richard III (a performance one critic said was the "angriest" Richard III of all time). He was on Broadway the following year, winning critical acclaim for his portrayal of the prosecutor in The Andersonville Trial by Saul Levitt. This was based on the military trial of the commandant of the infamous Civil War prison camp in Andersonville, Georgia. His performance earned him a mention in Time magazine. In 1970 Scott directed a highly acclaimed television version of this same play. It starred William Shatner, Richard Basehart, and Jack Cassidy, who was nominated for an Emmy Award for his performance as the defense lawyer in this production. Wikipedia